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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska found in the catalog.

Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska

M. J. Ellis

Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska

by M. J. Ellis

  • 355 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey, Books and Open-File Reports in Lincoln, Neb, Denver, CO .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Groundwater -- Nebraska

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Michael J. Ellis
    SeriesU.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 86-526
    ContributionsGeological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13565642M

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, began developing a groundwater-flow model of the Big Sioux aquifer in that will enable the City to make more informed water management decisions, such as delineation of areas of the greatest specific yield, which is crucial for locating municipal : Kristen J. Valseth, Gregory C. Delzer, Curtis V. Price. This valuable reference includes five new case histories: The Dakota Aquifer, Fractures Sedimentary Rocks--Newark basin, Faults as Aquifer Boundaries, Desert Hydrology--Azraq basin, Jordan. Uses the Internet to obtain hydrogeologic data and information. Includes well-developed case studies in 4/5(58).

    Nebraska. B R A I N A R D - V A L E X P L O R A T I O N R E S O U R C E S I N T E R N A T I O N A L i Decem Hydrogeologic Assessment and Framework Development of the Aquifers beneath the Brainard-Valparaiso Area of the Lower Platte South Natural Resources District in Eastern Thickness of Dakota aquifer system/Maha aquifer. _____b, Machine-readable files developed for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report , 23 p.

    A single map showing all of South Dakota’s aquifers does not exist. Most areas of the state are underlain by more than one aquifer which is a situation not conducive to illustration on a 2-dimensional map. Also, the boundaries of an aquifer may be uncertain due to the aquifer File Size: KB. WRI No 20 - The cleanup and protection of the Wahpeton Buried Valley Aquifer System, Richland County, North Dakota: Ground-water Data - by Dave Ripley, Plate 1 Plate 2 WRI No 22 - Hydrology of the Devils Lake Area, North Dakota - by Gregg Wiche and Steve Pusc,


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Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska by M. J. Ellis Download PDF EPUB FB2

This aquifer systems underlies approximately 94 percent of the State. Distribution of data sites is not uniform across the State. Although the aquifer systems underlies all or parts of 88 of Nebraska 's 93 counties, hydrogeologic data on the Dakota are available only for 83 counties.

Although the aquifer system underlies all or parts of 88 of Nebraska's 93 counties, hydrogeologic data on the Dakota are available only for 83 counties. This is because geologic conditions in the western part of the State are more favorable for the occurrence of petroleum and Author: M.J.

Ellis. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska [microform] in SearchWorks catalog.

Get this from a library. Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska. [M J Ellis; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska [microform] / by Michael J. Ellis U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey ; Books and Open-File Reports Lincoln, Neb.: Denver, CO Buy Hydrogeologic data for the Dakota aquifer system in Nebraska (Open-file report / U.S.

Geological Survey) by M. J Ellis (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : M. J Ellis. This valuable reference includes five new case histories: The Dakota Aquifer, Fractures Sedimentary Rocks—Newark basin, Faults as Aquifer Boundaries, Desert Hydrology—Azraq basin, Jordan.

Uses the Internet to obtain hydrogeologic data and information. Includes well-developed case studies in /5(46). The purpose of this groundwater atlas is to synthesize a wealth of hydrogeologic data that exists for Lancaster County that has not been published in readily accessible : Dana Divine.

The Dakota aquifer (formally called the Maha Aquifer) is by far the largest of these secondary aquifers, supplying all of the water to more than 3, wells in eastern Nebraska.

Seventy-five percent of these wells are domestic, although in places the aquifer is capable of supplying a sufficient volume of water for irrigation and commercial use. More recent geospatial data are available for selected principal aquifers as the result of recent and ongoing regional groundwater availability studies investigated by the Groundwater Resources Program (GWRP) to improve our understanding of groundwater availability in major aquifers across the Nation.

Principal Aquifers of the United States. The Dakota Aquifer is a part of the Great Plains Aquifer System, which “underlies most of Nebraska, about one-half of Kansas, the eastern one-third of Colorado, and small parts of New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, South Dakota, and Wyoming” (USGS, ).

Fig. 1 Area covered by the Dakota Aquifer. The High Plains aquifer overlies this confining system, and the hydraulic gradient is downward from the High Plains aquifer to the Great Plains aquifer system in most places.

For example, in the southwestern part of the Nebraska panhandle, the water table in the High Plains aquifer is more than 2, feet higher than the hydraulic head in the Great Plains aquifer system. The Dakota aquifer of the central Great Plains consists primarily of the Dakota Formation. For eastern Nebraska, Witzke and Ludvigson () have defined a general sequence for the Dakota Formation that includes a lower sandstone-dominated Nishnabotna Member and an upper mudstone-dominated Woodbury Member.

The Woodbury Member is the primary hydrostratigraphic unit in northeastern and Cited by: The Great Plains (Dakota) aquifer system is one of the most extensive in North America extending from the Arctic Circle to New Mexico, and underlies approximately 94% of Nebraska.

Geology, Groundwater Chemistry and Management of the Dakota Aquifer in Nebraska Compiled by David C. Gosselin, groundwater geologist, F. Edwin Harvey, groundwater geologist, and Charles Flowerday, editor, Conservation and Survey Division and School of Natural Resources Introduction The Dakota aquifer of the central Great Plains is a keyCited by: 2.

The glacial aquifer system (GLAC, Fig. 1a), the collection of aquifers within Quaternary sediments in the glaciated conterminous U.S. ( × 10 6 km 2 area north of the line of maximum glacial advance) (Yager et al., ), underlies parts of 25 states across the northern tier of the GLAC supplies groundwater withdrawals that serve about 30 million people and accounts for about 5% of Author: Melinda L.

Erickson, Richard M. Yager, Leon J. Kauffman, John T. Wilson. There are at least seven major aquifer systems in Nebraska. By far, the High Plains/Ogallala aquifer is the largest in terms of volume of water in storage and withdrawals for irrigation. Several secondary aquifers exist in areas outside of the High Plains aquifer, providing water for irrigation, municipal supplies, and domestic use in parts of far western and far eastern.

Overview of South Dakota's Dakota Aquifer R.A. Schoon 38 Dakota Aquifer System in the State of Colorado R.H. Pearl 41 Overview of Dakota Aquifer System in Nebraska M.J. Ellis 48 Availability and Quality of Water from the Dakota Aquifer, Northwest Iowa M.R. Burkart 56 Overview of Dakota Aquifer in Kansas H.E.

McGovern 58 Dakota Aquifer System in. This valuable reference includes five new case histories: The Dakota Aquifer, Fractures Sedimentary Rocks—Newark basin, Faults as Aquifer Boundaries, Desert Hydrology—Azraq basin, Jordan. Uses the Internet to obtain hydrogeologic data and information.

Includes well-developed case studies in 4/5(3). Digital map of aquifer boundary for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming This digital data set represents the extent of the High Plains aquifer in the central United States.

The hydrogeologic framework component will provide updated hydrostratigraphic surfaces and unit extents, building upon the last regional framework update of the Long Island aquifer system performed by the USGS in (Smolensky and others, ). As part of this update, a network of new groundwater wells will be installed at about 25 locations.

In Nebraska, there is a definite need to quantify the relationship between groundwater and surface water in order to ensure proper management of our water resources. Understanding the geologic framework is critical to understanding how ground water and surface are interconnected.

Our target audiences include researchers involved in computer simulation of groundwater-surface water .Vertical gradients in water chemistry and age in the northern High Plains Aquifer, Nebraska, [electronic resource] / by P.B. McMahon, J.K.

Böhlke, and C.P. Carney U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey Reston, Va Australian/Harvard Citation.